Dead Metal

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Dead Metal

Post by Renegadenemo »

Beautiful work but very... how can I put this... American?
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler
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StewDurham
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Re: Dead Metal

Post by StewDurham »

Renegadenemo wrote:Beautiful work but very... how can I put this... American?
Agreed. For some reason I like the "in progress" pics better than the finished article - it doesn't quite do it for me.

Some strange build techniques though - not sure what the tin foil's for, and there's obviously a lot of foam prototyping going on. Fair play to the guys though, they have done something they wanted in their own way, and done it well from the looks of it.
Good luck to the BBP team, makes me proud to be British (and a North-easterner to boot!). Damn fine work, chaps!
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Pullman99
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Re: Dead Metal

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In 2011, Bonhams auctioned the Austin-Healey 100S that had competed in the tragic 1955 Le Mans race and was partly the cause of the accident to Pierre Levegh's Merecdes-Benz 300 SLR. NOJ 393, one of the factory Special test cars , that had lain untouched for the previous 42 years has now had its restoration completed. The work was carried out by Marsh Classic Restorations, an Austin-Healey specialist in Australia, for its European based owner. They have restored, not without controversy, the car to its exact specification and appearance as it started Le Mans in 1955 complete with correct race numbers. Now, NOJ 393 has been reunited with another Special Test car, NOJ 392, to promote the sale of its sister car by Bonhams in its forthcoming auction at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. More details in the attached links.

Baonhams link:
http://www.bonhams.com/press_release/13549/

Feature from Classic & Sportscar:
http://www.classicandsportscar.com/news ... _article_2
Ian Robinson
Bluebird K7 - the restoration project of the Century.
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Renegadenemo
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Re: Dead Metal

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They have restored, not without controversy, the car to its exact specification and appearance as it started Le Mans in 1955 complete with correct race numbers.
What was the controversy about?
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler
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Pullman99
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Re: Dead Metal

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[quote="Renegadenemo"What was the controversy about?[/quote]

I think it has been fairly mild, actually, but there was a feeling at the time the car was sold by Bonhams in 2011 that it had remained very original with only the rebuilding as a result of the Le Mans accident and its subsequent, mostly club racing, career. A full restoration that would remove such "patina" (for want of a better word) was, therefore, likely to receive mixed views.

From a personal standpoint - and I do not have much knowledge of Austin-Healeys, although I have driven several - I would suggest that this particular restoration process has recognised the historical importance of this particular car not solely as a "works" car, but also due to its unfair association with the world's worst motor racing accident. The story of Lance Macklin's involvement with the Levegh Mercedes crash is well known although the resultant effect on Macklin as an individual perhaps less so. The new owner has invested huge sums in the purchase and restoration of a car which has a unique place in history and - whilst obvious comparisons with K7's rebuild are clear - with the Healey being presented in its condition and specification as it started that ill-fated 24 Hours. it is to be hoped that allowing the car to be demonstrated at the likes of the Festival of Speed will keep the story alive. I am not sure if there is any serious intention to prepare the car for historic racing. I personally believe that would simply destroy that which has been saved. The quality and care taken by Marsh Classic Restorations is evident.
Last edited by Pullman99 on Sat Jun 22, 2013 5:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ian Robinson
Bluebird K7 - the restoration project of the Century.
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Renegadenemo
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Re: Dead Metal

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I'm always intrigued by any controversy surrounding the rebuild of a machine. My personal belief is that every machine should work as intended or at least be capable of doing so and a dead machine is to engineering what a stuffed eagle is to ornithology.
There will always be worthwhile exceptions, however. It would take rather a lot of effort to fly a space shuttle at an air show, for example, but normally there's little excuse for killing off a perfectly good machine.

I have argued for years with the good people at the FAAM that they ought to find out what it takes to fire up their famous Corsair. A volunteer team spent over four years carefully picking off paint applied in the eighties to reveal its original wartime paint scheme - the only one anywhere in the world, but do they know how to start it?

http://www.fleetairarm.com/exhibit/cors ... -4-18.aspx

The argument against running up any of its systems is that there's a number of flying Corsairs out there so there's nothing to be learned, but is that really the case? When was the last time anyone tried to make a machine of this specification operable? What priceless, historical nuggets might be revealed? But I don't disagree with leaving it alone.

We've heard all sorts of similar arguments regarding K7. We couldn't rebuild her because we'd 'destroy history', we were told, yet industry has unfailingly embraced this history over the past few years and added to it with some magnificent gestures on our behalf.

And yet our sister project is busy creating one of those notable exceptions... I, for one, would not like to fly in our Barracuda, and fly it never will. It's being built for display only though we said from the off that it has to have an engine that works and be capable of starting and taxiing. That'll do as the best of a bad job. And the best part is that all they want is a plane. No controversy, no idiots of any type, no hassle - I could get used to this...
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler
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rob565uk
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Re: Dead Metal

Post by rob565uk »

I too detest dead metal and was particularly distressed when I went to see John Cobb's Mobil Railton Special, suspended in a semi-dismantled state.

With K7, my overwhelming feeling is that most of the current critics will change their tune once she is running. It was good to see the test Orpheus coming to life last Saturday as we installed and tested the instrument panel and ran up the igniters.

1 in 10 people understands binary. The other one doesn't
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Pullman99
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Re: Dead Metal

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Very much alive metal here - and sounds glorious too!

I went along to the National Motor Museum's "Rod and Custom Show" last weekend. Turned out not to be a fishing event after all. Neither fishing nor custom cars are really my scene but the quality of the work involved is amazing in most cases. One of the highlights for this year’s show was the official handing back to the Museum of Europe’s first dragster, Sydney Allard’s 1961 Allard Chrysler.

The Allard Chrysler is owned by the National Motor Museum Trust, having been bequeathed along with an Allard J2 road car by its then owner, Allard enthusiast Brian Golder, some years ago, and was cosmetically restored by the museum in the early 1980s having lain in pieces for many years after last being used in anger in the mid-1960s. During the past five years, it has been fully restored by a group of enthusiasts, the Allard Chrysler Action Group (ACAG), in a lengthy, but very successful project. In celebration of its completion, the dragster was officially handed back to the museum on Sunday 16th June by ACAG and the Allard and the Camaro fired up at various intervals throughout the day to give visitors a rare opportunity to hear the engine at full throttle - lovely! Project Patron, and NMMT Trustee, Nick Mason officiated in the handover.

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History and more details of the Allard slingshot dragster and of its restoration here:

http://www.allardchrysler.org/
Ian Robinson
Bluebird K7 - the restoration project of the Century.
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Pullman99
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Re: Dead Metal

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Another racing restoration that's made the headlines is the rebuild, by Lotus enthusiast Andy Middlehurst, of Jim Clark's Lotus 43 and the car has now been nominated for Restoration of the Year in the International Historic Motoring Awards sponsored by Octane Magazine.

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Public debut at the Lotus Festival at Snetterton, June 2010

Andy has completed one of the most important and fascinating restoration projects of, not only this past year but, possibly the past decade.

His rebuild of the 1966 United States Grand Prix winning Lotus 43 - Chassis 43/R1 - is a true masterpiece of sensitive restoration. From the very badly damaged remains of what had been a converted Formula 5000 car (raced by Jock Russell) following its brief Formula One career, Andy has succeeded in completing what is arguably one of the most complex motorsport restorations ever undertaken. Not only has the chassis been superbly rebuilt in Andy's workshops but he has managed to find and rebuild - with the expert assistance of Hall & Hall - one of the legendary BRM H-16 engines.

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Just awaiting that all important H-16!

In 1966, when F1 changed from 1.5 litres to 3 litre power, Lotus was still using an enlarged version of the Coventry-Climax V8 in its Type 33 chassis. Around the corner, and debuting in 1967, was the all conquering Ford-Cosworth DFV that would see action in the Lotus 49. In the meantime, Lotus expanded its "family" of Type 38 - 42 - 43 type chassis to create the F1 Type 43. This was to be powered by the BRM H-16 that the Bourne company had developed for its own Grand Prix cars but which faced a troubled start and an even more difficult couple of seasons with the famous British team. The engine was designed to use the same dimensions as the BRM V8 but with effectively two engines opened out to 180 degrees and placed one on top of the other with the two crankshafts linked to a common output. With a specification like that, you can see why the restoration required the dedication it has received.

Team Lotus’s experiences with the engine were no better but, in the back of the Type 43, they achieved a fairly impressive record all the same. Six starts for the car and one, albeit fairly lucky, win and that with an engine "borrowed" from BRM after Team Lotus were left without a useable unit following practice. Jim Clark's amazing abilities obviously helped but the US win in 1966 remains the only occasion when an engine of more than 12 cylinders has won a World Championship Formula One race.

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The quality of the work undertaken by Middlehurst Motorsport at their Wigan base is superb

The completed Type 43 made its first public runs at the Goodwood Revival last month, taking part in a tribute parade to Jim Clark that also included the Indianapolis 500 winner - 38/1 - being demonstrated by Dario Franchitti.

More pics from Wouter Melissen at Goodwood here:

http://www.ultimatecarpage.com/cg/272/Lotus-43-BRM.html

In my view, this is one of the great restorations that deserves recognition far beyond the historic motorsport scene and clearly demonstrates the breadth of expertise able to be applied to such projects within the UK. I personally hope that this truly great story, and the achievements of all who have been involved in this restoration will be recognised in the Octane Awards.
Ian Robinson
Bluebird K7 - the restoration project of the Century.
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Renegadenemo
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Re: Dead Metal

Post by Renegadenemo »

Ian,

I was once assured by Los Marillios that music piracy is not such a big deal because the Internet is 'as wide as it's long', an observation that equally describes the depth and scope of your knowledge of your chosen subject. Your ongoing interest in our efforts is flattering.

Bill
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler
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