Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

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Dangermouse
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Re: SS Nomadic (& other historic vessels)

Post by Dangermouse »

One bit of footage I found particularly interesting was from one ROV inside the dining room while the other lit from outside. Hey presto, all the (intact) stained glass looked amazing!

My house dates from 1905 and has all of the original stained glass in the top sashes, which is very similar in style to that on Titanic. Thanks to an optician who owned the place in the 60s it didn't suffer the fate of many Edwardian buildings.
Matt in Mid Wales
Dangermouse
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Re: SS Nomadic (& other historic vessels)

Post by Dangermouse »

Yep, that was where I first saw the stained glass bit!
Matt in Mid Wales
DamienB
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by DamienB »

National Geographics 'Titanic - Case Closed' was, I thought, really impressive. Finally an apparently well researched and plausible theory to explain why they didn't see a whacking great big iceberg on a clear starry night until it was too late - and the theory also explained why the Californian's lookouts didn't identify the Titanic as being a liner in distress. Really well done I thought - worth watching.
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Renegadenemo
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by Renegadenemo »

I also don't for one minute buy any theory that tries to defend the inaction of the Californian- they sat there and basically just watched the Titanic sink.
I once joined an exped up into the icebergs and it's scary. By day we stopped and had a party on one but by night you're waiting for the bang. We were told to have drysuits immediately to hand at all times in case we hit 'blue ice', which is very dense, almost invisible and awash at the best of times. It's also hard as steel and liable to sink your ship.
Considering that Californian had decided to stop, they were facing the same conditions as Titanic, had no radio comm's and didn't expect to see Titanic sinking I'd say they were perfectly justified in sitting tight until the sun came up.
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Richie
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by Richie »

i watched the recent titanic documentary, along with the aftermath documentary.... both were good...the aftermath one was a bit annoying as it kept repeating stuff over and over again.... interesting to note that when they ran short of coffins it was the third class bodies that were being tossed back into the sea.. I love the titanic documentaries, weird how tragedy always seems to interest folk....
"You can screw a man down until he takes to drinking......take me to the fantastic place..."
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Renegadenemo
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by Renegadenemo »

Some of the Californian crew thought something was amiss, but nobody quite acted enough- Captain Lord in particular.
Yeah but they didn't know they were watching something that we're still gossiping about a hundred years later. It was likely just a strange night at sea and no one gave it a lot of thought until the radio operator got out of bed next morning.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler
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Richie
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by Richie »

surely you see flares going off and you would act ? at very least wake up the radio op and see if there had been any distress calls etc etc :ugeek:
"You can screw a man down until he takes to drinking......take me to the fantastic place..."
Dangermouse
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by Dangermouse »

Interestingly the flat calm should apparently have been a hint that there was a lot of ice about. The sea was famously pond-like on that night (which didn't help as there were no waves breaking against the iceberg, which would have made it more visible). Ice acts much like oil in preventing waves from growing.

Carpathia in her dash north apparently stationed a lookout right down at the bow, as well as the usual crow's nest and bridge positions. They reckoned that a man there would stand a better chance of seeing an iceberg as a shadow against the stars. Had Titanic done this they might well have gained the extra few seconds of warning needed.
Matt in Mid Wales
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bluebirdsback
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by bluebirdsback »

Have heard this a few times now, the theory is that if Titanic headed straight on into the iceberg it would have caused less damage and might have saved her, another mistake made was to give full rudder then banging her into reverse canceling out the effect of the rudder, I am no expert but would like to know from you lot out there that are, if there is any truth in these statements. Hind sight is a wonderful thing and if i had been captain that night i dont think i would have gone nose first into the iceberg. My second thought would be stop this bloody ship.
The moment you make something idiot proof a new breed of idiots will come along and prove you wrong
Dangermouse
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Re: Nomadic, Titanic & other historic vessels

Post by Dangermouse »

I don't see the full reverse/crash stop as likely - Murdoch wasn't that daft, he would have known that not only would it disable the steering but it would also have taken a while for the engines to stop and reverse. A witness reported seeing the telegraphs set to "all stop" on the bridge shortly after, so I'd say it's more likely that he called for "all stop" instead. The rudder would still have responded but Titanic would have begun to slow down. Add misinterpretations by investigators who don't realise that all stop merely means "stop the engines" and you have a tale of a frantic attempt to avoid collision by reversing engines.

There is also the fact that the first most passengers knew was the infamous "like a giant finger drawn along the ship's side" moment of impact. A crash stop would have been a very noisy event with a lot of vibration at such a speed (if it didn't snap the propshafts and wreck the engines), I've experienced similar at harbour speeds on a large ferry before now and you definitely know about it when they reverse engines!

Crashing head-on would probably have left Titanic able to reach New York at the expense of anyone unfortunate enough to be in the stokers quarters in the bow. However, it's so ingrained to avoid obstacles that people will always try to steer around them. The reckoning is that Murdoch came incredibly close to avoiding the collision but mistimed the second turn (to push the stern around and away from the iceberg) by a few seconds.
Matt in Mid Wales
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