Pic of the Day

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rob565uk
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by rob565uk » Sat Sep 24, 2016 4:46 pm

Re today's POTD of the acrylic frame for the canopy, to the best of my knowledge there are no accurate or dimensioned drawings for this, so it had to be planned and made on the basis of empirical measurement and observation of the cockpit opening, plus a lot of detailed study of archive imagery. In my view, it's an outstanding piece of work.


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Gareth Hayes
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Gareth Hayes » Sun Sep 25, 2016 9:31 am

Now although you good people have done your very best to use as much as the original Bluebird as you possibly can, there must be other components beside the canopy, that we either, too badly damaged in the crash, or still at the bottom of Coniston Lake. Of all of them, which is the one you'd most like to have access too?

Gareth Hayes
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Gareth Hayes » Sun Sep 25, 2016 11:03 am

Thanks for the detailed answer. What with the huge damage caused by the crash, & the missing parts that went Whi knows where, after the abortive recovery attempts in '67. I've always been stunned that you've managed to repair & re-use as much original K7 as you have. Keep up the fantastic work

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Sun Sep 25, 2016 11:45 am

We once flew the ROV over a bundle of wires poking out of the lakebed but we had no manipulator on the vehicle, nor did we have a diver that day and the worst part is that the wiring bundle wasn't sonar-visible so we had no reliable means to return to it. All we could do was look at it in the monitors and wonder what might be on the end of it.
The canopy frame is a mystery too, because it was supposedly made of fibreglass so it ought to have remained in some sizeable pieces and would certainly be sonar-visible but my thinking these days is that it probably went off to the west where Donald went and we didn't really search much further west than where we found him so it may be out there somewhere.
I'd like to have another mission out on the lake one day just to collect crumbs for the museum. It's a lot of fun exploring the dark, muddy depths.
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conistoncollie
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by conistoncollie » Thu Sep 29, 2016 10:50 am

re Pic of the day - canopy wheel bracket - nice bit of 'photo-archaeology' Mike
Recreating things from old photos is not as easy as it looks and takes hours of patient, forensic study, and that's without factoring-in pesky lens distortion and parallax errors.

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rob565uk
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by rob565uk » Thu Sep 29, 2016 1:34 pm

Fabulous job Mike !


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Renegadenemo
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Thu Sep 29, 2016 7:49 pm

It's a lovely little piece of tinware, very well interpreted and equally well executed, Mr. Bullfrog.

In the meantime, Barry Hares is making all the other twiddly bits for the other end of the canopy, which has been on hold this week as we tried to work out where the main fuel tank was fouling on the inlet duct. That's now had a pretty comprehensive round of heat-shrinking to get it clear but there's a pitch of blind rivets on each side of the duct that fix the aft edges of the original duct liners and they have long tails so they may yet be drilled out and swapped for solid rivets in case the tank hits one and loosens it and it ends up going through the engine.
Then we'll get back to the canopy frame, which of course has to come before the canopy itself, then there's the rest of the fuel plumbing and completing the mod's to the moving dolly so we can get the boat outside for some further engine tests in the hull, Then there's...
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

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jonwrightk7
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by jonwrightk7 » Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:08 pm

A cracking piece of work there Mike! :D :D
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by malcolm uk » Sat Oct 01, 2016 2:52 pm

I know that those working on the boat are being meticulous with the making and reassembling of parts, however even with nyloc nuts (and do I see spring washers), the attachment of the canopy latch with bolts thread upwards from below would have received a 'slap' from my engineering mentor in the sixties and seventies. What happened to assuming that a nut can come off because of vibration yet the bolt will probably stay in place?
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mtskull
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by mtskull » Sun Oct 02, 2016 7:54 am

Some years ago I read an account by Charles Yeager, concerning an investigation that he had been involved with, into a spate of crashes (of F-86 Sabres, if I remember correctly).
There was a particular bolt in a control assembly that had to be fitted "upside down" i.e. head down, shank pointing up, because it could restrict or even jam the control movement if fitted the other way. On all of the crashed aircraft this bolt had been found fitted the opposite way to that specified.
They eventually traced the problem to a single assembly line worker who had ignored the specification and fitted the bolts with the shank pointing downwards because "everybody knows that is the right way to fit a bolt".
It being a gentler age (and probably because it was politically expedient to keep it quiet), the whole fleet was inspected and rectified and fellow responsible was simply informed that he must in future fit the bolts strictly according to the plans.
To quote Yeager: "We didn't tell him how many people he'd killed".
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