Pic of the Day

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Sat Mar 15, 2014 8:42 pm

Love today's POTD, would love a rig like that, if it could be fed from a remote supply ie bottle....
That way I could dive without destroying my lugs.
It's ten times worse for your ears because you still have to clear them but you can't get your hand to your nose to do it because there's a sheet of glass in the way. There's a little T-shaped device instead that you push up into the helmet with your finger then try to block your nose with it - it's called a 'snot bar' and it doesn't work very well.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

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Richie
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Richie » Sun Mar 16, 2014 1:23 pm

Loving the dive related POTD's you should do a diary piece on this alone ! Unless you are saving it for the book ;)
Clarence come out ov zat tank at vonz !

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Mike Bull
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Mike Bull » Sun Mar 16, 2014 1:40 pm

Book! The poor sod doesn't have time to write the diary!

The pics are a nice change, although for every pic I take in the workshop I'm still automatically roughing out a paragraph of text in my head to go with it! :lol:

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Sun Mar 16, 2014 2:18 pm

We had two of those bags on the wreck at any one time. The wreck landed tail first and buried the back end about a metre into the mud with the front slapping down flatly. The front just lifted up using a hydraulic crane and a long rope but the back wouldn't move. When we eventually got it free it slid out of the clay much as it had slid in almost as though it were slotted into a rail. From there we shackled in a pair of bags about 5m under the surface and blew them. It's impossible to blow them evenly so one always arrived before the other but once both were on the surface and fully blown we let things settle down then shackled the other pair in 5m down. The main lifting lines were broken into 5m sections too with rings and shackles so as a section was made redundant we could take that out too.
The rigging at the bottom end comprised a pair of heavy spreaders with strops attached at the outer ends leading to the root of the main spar at the front of the wreck and the lifting eyes at the back. Either bag could support the wreck so had either attachment failed we'd not have dropped the treasure. Our main concern was the spar, which was slotted into some very corroded and broken looking steelwork. It later proved to be bombproof but we couldn't tell that at the time.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

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Richie
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Richie » Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:31 pm

Was that the issue you guys had a disagreement over on the barge ? "the extra strop" on the documentary ?
Clarence come out ov zat tank at vonz !

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Sun Mar 16, 2014 5:30 pm

Was that the issue you guys had a disagreement over on the barge ? "the extra strop" on the documentary ?
We had concerns about the main spar tearing free because the steelwork looked a bit worse for wear and an early possible solution was to lift from the spar then run a strop under the boat and lift with that instead. The disadvantage there was we had no means of preventing it slipping fore or aft so it was abandoned in favour of chancing it with the spar and using a bag at both ends of sufficient capacity that if we had a total failure of either one, the other would support the entire wreck. Each bag could lift two tons and after consultation with Ken Norris we estimated there was a ton and a half of scrap to move.
So we lifted the front of the wreck by pulling hard on the spar to see what would happen and it lifted cleanly but we discovered that the underside skin was bent downwards and even with the front lifted clear of the mud the skin arced downwards and speared an unknown distance into the mud forming a tunnel under the boat.
So what - it made no difference until the idea of passing the strop was somehow resurrected and that's where the trouble started. You see, firstly it was completely unnecessary, especially at that time when we were yet to work out how to get the back end free of the mud. Then, the only way to pass it was through the tunnel created by the wrecked underside and that was just asking for trouble. Next, there wasn't quite enough umbilical to put the hard-hat diver down to do it so it would have needed free-swimming divers, ie the volunteer team, to sweep the strop and they had no surface comm's if something went wrong.

It was a truly stupid idea and I flatly refused to have anything to do with it or risk divers in the attempt.

In the end (I suspect as a face-saving exercise) there was a strop passed under there after the boat was well clear of the lakebed and they finally had enough umbilical to get a surface-supplied diver to the job, then, as predicted, it slipped aft as the bags inflated unevenly leaving the entire mass hanging on one bag and had to be removed again.

[Edit} We had to work with a small team of commercial divers because the BBC (who had been introduced to the project by a magazine editor whose publication I had invested in) were at the time self-regulating from a H & S standpoint and needed a scapegoat in the event of an accident. The commercial divers were therefore a political appointment though we did choose them ourselves rather than let the BBC do it because at least they were rebreather friendly at a time when rebreathers were receiving much bad press. We didn't need or particularly want them, however, and it was never a very comfortable relationship except with Zaid Al-Obaidy and Ian Talor who were recruited as qualified commercial divers but also as mates who we dived with at weekends anyway.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

Terminator
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Terminator » Sun Mar 23, 2014 11:14 pm

I would say that's the Corporal behind you and the boat Bill. He's stood on the Jetty with cap and dark glasses on, pretty sure it's him.
Novie
"Never ride faster than your Angel can fly"

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Mon Mar 24, 2014 12:57 pm

Aye - that's him.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

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huszarail
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by huszarail » Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:59 am

I'd just like to say how much I'm enjoying the retro POTD. Nice pic of Bills younger slimmer brother today. :)
I hope the hat is well preserved for its return to the lakeside. I guess a few weld burns and smears of choccy sauce would add to the authenticity though.
I'm only a man from Del Monte..........

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Richie
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Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Richie » Fri Mar 28, 2014 12:10 pm

I don't think the world is ready to see that hat again. :lol: :lol: :lol:
Clarence come out ov zat tank at vonz !

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