Richie's Little Tank

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Richie
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Richie » Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:09 am

On the theme of working parts being cleaned, I found some pics of other bits I had bothered to take pictures of during the restoration.

Here we have the gear stick base which bolts to the hull floor, it's a cast steel piece which has a spring and a bush inside, this clamps onto a steel ball at the base of the gear stick. On the side is the usual brass grease nipple. This was an easy bit to clean up, just pull it out the hull strip it down then rebuild and re paint.
The widget I am talking about is buried in the middle of this lot !
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Then cleaned up into this
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This was placed in storage awaiting its return. On the theme of gear sticks I thought I would continue to the other end of this system. From the base of the gear stick where the above widget sits is a shaft which runs through the centre bulkhead towards the rear, where another widget is bolted to the hull floor, the shaft runs through the widget and another large right angle cast component so fixed on. The cast item then connects to the swing bar on the gearbox which selects the gears.

Here is said widget removed from the hull and the shaft.
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There is a cylinder which shrouds the cast poll, inside this is a bearing which floats with the poll and shaft and also allows the shaft to spin. I had to dismantle the shroud to extract the bearings and rebuild the unit. Once done it was cleaned down and rebuilt, then re painted and stored

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Here is the complete unit before I pulled it out, partially hidden by a bracket which had fallen into the hull.
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So far it's the little bits like this I have found give the greatest reward as you get quick results, and you feel you are getting somewhere :)
Last edited by Richie on Tue Dec 17, 2013 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Clarence come out ov zat tank at vonz !

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Richie
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Richie » Tue Dec 17, 2013 10:45 am

More and more bits were being plucked from the to do box, next on the list was the brake bell cranks, these sit on the lower transom of the hull and connect a push rod which runs from the front of the carrier, to the plunger on the expander unit for the brakes, and there is one on each side of the hull. The unit consists of a cast housing with a grease nipple, two brackets to bolt it to the transom, and a central spindle with needle bearings.

Here is the item as purchased
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Again it was an easy enough job, just a case of stripping the thing down, attacking it with cellulose thinners to de grease, then a dose of wire wheel.

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Each needle was counted out of the unit, then cleaned with thinners, once I had finished with the housing it was packed with grease and the axle spindle posted through, after that it was a simple case of slipping the needles back in and winding the nuts back on.
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I still have to make some cork washers for the top and bottom.

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Both are yet to be returned to the hull.

I continued on and thought I better start to try and collect bits for my dash panel (basically it's the starter button and all the gauges)

I did some wheeling and dealing and managed to secure an original Mk1 dash, two mk2 new old stock speedometers (one was still packed in its wax sealed box !!! Oil pressure gauge and ammeter and switch panel assembly again both new old stock.

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Note one of the speedo's has been stripped down....... I came under some serious fire for this, not because it is original material (these gauges are in abundance) but due to what the gauge contained

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Note the glowing segments..........Radium 226.... Gauges of this era were radium luminised, not knowing at the time what I had potentially done to myself my bottom dropped out when I was told by a collector that I would be dead within a year...... As a result I contacted a doctor who specialises in the subject and was given advice how to clean down my workshop... The danger with this system is particle inhalation, luckily at the time I was wearing an appropriate respirator.. But none the less it took the wind out of my sails.

I collected surface samples before and after cleaning and sent them off for analysis which later confirmed I had cleaned the job down correctly.

When I rebuilt the gauge I fitted it with the correct mk1 style facia which I made and placed it back into the dash panel
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This needs wiring up which I need to get someone to do at some point.

On the subject of these gauges, it seems that as so many people know nothing about the genuine risks many museums are ripping gauges out of historic vehicles to have them destroyed.......utterly utterly foolish ! They pose no risk when sealed behind the glass but as it has the stigma of having an invisible killer, people tend to panic before engaging the brain.
(Probably something I should have done before stripping mine down)

There were mixed opinions about the patina on the dash plate, some are of the view that I should have filled the pitting, however I saw this as sanitising what I had, which if I was going to do that I would have made a new dash out of new material.......I kinda like the pitting anyhoo
Clarence come out ov zat tank at vonz !

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Renegadenemo » Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:22 pm

This needs wiring up which I need to get someone to do at some point.
I'm sure Checkie will help you out with that...
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

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Mike Bull
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Mike Bull » Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:40 pm

Richie wrote:There were mixed opinions about the patina on the dash plate, some are of the view that I should have filled the pitting, however I saw this as sanitising what I had, which if I was going to do that I would have made a new dash out of new material.......I kinda like the pitting anyhoo
See, I think the pitting looks superb- nicely original, yet somehow still smart, rejuvenated, and totally fit for further service. Sound familiar?! :D

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rob565uk
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by rob565uk » Tue Dec 17, 2013 4:34 pm

Renegadenemo wrote:
This needs wiring up which I need to get someone to do at some point.
I'm sure Checkie will help you out with that...
What, MORE wires :ugeek:

It will be a pleasure Richie, no problem.....

p.s. I agree with your approach on the dash plate - spot on

1 in 10 people understands binary. The other one doesn't

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Renegadenemo » Tue Dec 17, 2013 4:48 pm

Agree completely - the pitting is a must, it looks brilliant.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

Dangermouse
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Dangermouse » Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:33 pm

Richie wrote:
On the subject of these gauges, it seems that as so many people know nothing about the genuine risks many museums are ripping gauges out of historic vehicles to have them destroyed.......utterly utterly foolish ! They pose no risk when sealed behind the glass but as it has the stigma of having an invisible killer, people tend to panic before engaging the brain.
(Probably something I should have done before stripping mine down)
I did some research into similar matters a while ago after coming into possession of a camera lens containing thorium. Naturally there are plenty of people who hear "radioactive" and run screaming. I'm not overly worried though as I have no intention of breaking it and breathing the dust, or holding it up to my eye for long periods (having a camera between me and the lens cuts the exposure dramatically). I suspect people living in areas built on granite have a higher exposure from background radiation than I do from using this lens occasionally. I do store it well away from my bed, a quick check with a Russian dosimeter (ebay) suggests that whatever type of particles it emits only travel for a metre or two at most.

I'd imagine radium sealed within a gauge poses a similarly low risk. I don't think there were spikes in cancer rates amongst forces personnel who spent years driving, flying or sailing in the vicinity of these things?
Matt in Mid Wales

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Renegadenemo » Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:37 pm

I'd imagine radium sealed within a gauge poses a similarly low risk. I don't think there were spikes in cancer rates amongst forces personnel who spent years driving, flying or sailing in the vicinity of these things?
The people who painted the dials at Smiths Instruments all died and a big chunk of soil had to be excavated and buried somewhere else, but they did lick the brushes and throw the old thinners out of the window...
The museologists reckon you could land in trouble if you put a box of old instruments under your bed but they likened the risk to a coal fire. Sit a little way back from it and you'll be OK. Breathing the dust is another matter, however, but thoriated tungstens are still used in TIG welding so they can't be as bad as all that. You still have to grind them sharp.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

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rob565uk
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by rob565uk » Tue Dec 17, 2013 9:01 pm

In a previous life related to marine radio and radar in the Merchant Navy, I had to complete a 3 day course on Atomic, Biological and Chemical (ABC) warfare. This was run by the Royal Navy and was compulsory for all merchant seamen, because MN ships can be commandeered by the RN in time of war and therefore we had to understand the basics of ABC warfare in order to work effectively with the RN.

The course was delivered with great gusto and aplomb by a long time served Chief Petty Officer who had clearly seen it all and delighted in the odd bit of gallows humour.

Part of the Atomic section concerned Geiger counters and their use. He produced a lead-lined box and with a long pair of tongs, flipped the lid up and deftly removed a 10p-sized piece of material and placed it with exaggerated care in front of the Geiger counter, which gave off a few desultory pops to confirm the radioactivity. He then asked if anyone had a luminous watch and persuaded its owner to place the watch in front of the counter. The Geiger counter went off like a firecracker ..... and the owner of the watch looked more than a little dubious as he reclaimed his own personal radioactive source ... The CPO advised him "not to keep it in a trouser pocket unless you run out of money for condoms young Man"

The CPO's other gem related to the principal effects of a nuclear weapon detonating,i.e. Flash, Sound, Shockwaves, Debris etc. Pointing out that exposure to the flash will damage the eyes in a fraction of a second, he concluded "So, if you see a bright flash in the sky, DO NOT look at it, right - got it?"

1 in 10 people understands binary. The other one doesn't

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Dominic Owen
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Re: Richie's Little Tank

Post by Dominic Owen » Tue Dec 17, 2013 10:40 pm

Here's a little snap my dad took back in the 50's. With his back to the flash, eyes screwed shut and hands over them, he said that he could see the bones in his hands like an x-ray and had a hot blast rush past him. He was perfectly safe, however, as he had his back to it and had the collar of his short-sleeved shirt turned up. :roll:
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